Account Login
Display Cart  Cart
 
  Available Birds    Forums    Photos    Support    My Account  
Macaws and their playfulness - and BEAKS!
BirdBreeders.com
 Home          Members     Calendar     Who's On

Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
        

Home » Bird Chat » Species Chat » Macaws » Macaws and their playfulness - and BEAKS!

123»»»

Macaws and their playfulness - and BEAKS! Expand / Collapse
Message
Posted 9/2/2005 12:30:51 PM Post #80
 

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being
Hi everyone!

Think you want a Macaw, but you're afraid? Yep, that's a good, and healthy sign.  If you RESPECT these bird giants - you'll be fine.

If you get a baby/young bird, they're still only as good as what you make them. If you tease them, much like a puppy - you'll get what you deserve - they will bite back, etc. etc.

These birds are highly sensitive, and very intelligent.  They're minds are much like 4-year old children and will act accordingly.

Let's discuss these gentle giants - any thoughts? Questions out there? 

We love them!

Manon:bgm:

Manon

Posted 9/29/2005 1:52:13 PM Post #140
 

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie
I have an adult pair of Red Front Macaws and will soon be picking up my baby this weekend. 

Red Fronts are considered a "middle" or "medium size" Macaw.  In my mind they are truly the smallest of the big Macaws, but not in personality.  They are awsome Macaws!  For someone wanting a Macaw with beauty and personality - this is one kind I highly recommend.

Owner and Lover of Birds!

Posted 10/30/2005 1:18:44 AM Post #218
 

Forum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum Guru

Here is my baby (1 yr. old) Toby in his outdoor flight. He's great and isn't really that loud as people always say they are (of course I'm a bird person so it dosen't bother me as much) Really the only time he gets to "honking" is when he smells dinner cooking and wants to be the first served. He also honks just before it gets dark and he want in the house cage for the night (normal roosting behavior). He loves to wave and talks and does the B&G Macaw bob. He dosen't nip at all but will try to lick and feel your hand or fingers if you let him ( I try to avoid this) but ouch the claws get so sharp so fast. He is about due for his manicure agian which he dosen't care too much for but tolerates. Routine is the key~~

Regards,
Mandy Tucker
www.singing-wings-aviary.com

Posted 11/13/2005 12:37:20 PM Post #235
 

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie
Respect them?Absolutely! Fear them? Definitely not! They will feel your fear and become frightened themselve and you will get bit trying to handle them. With beaks that can open a brazil nut faster than you can hand it to them a bite is not good. Rarely life threatening but very painful nonetheless. I have a Bluffons hybrid and another coming soon . A military pair, severes,and Hahns. All are wonderful birds. Does anyone know a definitive way to tell large miltary macaws from buffons macaws? Oh almost forgot we now have a baby scarlet macaw. These biggies are a lot of fun to raise.

Wisdom is knowledge and experience filtered with common sense.
Posted 11/26/2005 12:52:29 PM Post #244
 

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being
Hi, here are some of the differences that I've come across in my Parrot book:

The Military Macaw is a large parrot, though slightly smaller than some other Macaw breeds. At maturity they measure 27.5 inches, wingspan of 14 inches. The average adult weighs anywhere from 862g to 1074g. The Military Macaw has a largely green plumage. Olive-yellow is seen under the wing and olive bronze under the wing covets. From the back the feathers on tail are generally reddish brown on the top with blue at the tips. The underneath of the tail is olive yellow like the wing. He has bare whitish cheeks and crossed with black feathered lines. The cheeks are edge with brown feathers that range from olive-brown to blackish-brown. The Military Macaw eyes have a light yellow iris. 

The Buffon's Macaw has yellowish-green feathers with a forehead and feather-lines of red. The feathers underneath towards the back are light blue, while the top side of the tail is a lighter, reddish-brown with blue on the edges. The bill is black with a pale tip and the eyes are generally yellow. The body is usually about 34 inches in length with a wingspan of 50 inches and weighs in at between 1200-1600 grams.

Hope this helps....we have a Military for a pet but the Buffons are gorgeous as well!

Manon:bgm:

Manon

Posted 1/26/2006 10:34:01 AM Post #320
 

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being
Hey, good luck with the new Fids!

Hoping to see pictures of them-when you get a chance. Macaws are great great birds

to have and to love.

Manon

www.wingspanaviaries.com

Manon

Posted 7/6/2006 5:18:19 PM Post #543
 

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie
I agreee the Macaw is a wonderful and intellegent bird. I have a B&G who I adore. They require a gentle but firm owner and they definately sense fear. My B&G (Bubba) don't laugh it was his name when I got him can inflict a hurting bite even during play not meaning to hurt me. Not many friends who come over ever atempt to try to pet him because of his large beak and very loud voice but do admire his beauty. His favorite past time is chasing my dog all over the house saying GET IT GET IT!!! Then saying  BOBBY BOBBY BOBBY (dogs name)

Bubba

 

Picture Of Bubba chasing poor Bobby

Bonnie

Posted 2/1/2007 3:40:13 PM Post #760
 

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being
hi!

Now that is a riot!  But I'd keep an eye on them, my guess is, the bird will win out over the dog!  And vet bills are steep!

But he also needs to understand the meaning of 'no' and the consequences.  Like ignoring him if he bites, or putting him back up on his stand, etc.

Manon

www.wingspanaviaries.com

Manon

Posted 10/3/2007 11:28:40 PM Post #1028
 

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie
Hi I am new and this to Bonnie, I have a 3 yr B&G Macaw raised it from a baby and mine love to get down and chase the dogs out yelling get out and her best friend is a 4 yr old English Mastiff that she protects from everyone. My B&G hasn't lived in a cage for over 2 yrs now but if she bites she gets time out in the cage and if she has done something wrong she will run to the cage and climb in and close the door herself and say bad girl time out. She also plays well with other animals and loves to show off for people.
Posted 10/11/2007 10:00:29 PM Post #1037
 

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie
Self-punishment?

Are you sure that she is not part "house-elf"?

(if you are not into Harry Potter, house elfs are magical creatures bound to the family of their master. When they break a rule, they punish themselves...a bit masochistic though)

« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

123»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT -5:00, Time now is 10:24am